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Dataset

Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS)

National Computational Infrastructure
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ctx_ver=Z39.88-2004&rft_val_fmt=info%3Aofi%2Ffmt%3Akev%3Amtx%3Adc&rfr_id=info%3Asid%2FANDS&rft_id=http://nci.org.au/uploads/file/Foretelling-Our-Climate-Future.pdf&rft.title=Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS)&rft.publisher=National Computational Infrastructure&rft.description=The Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS) is a coupled climate and earth system simulator being developed as a joint initiative of the Bureau of Meteorology and CSIRO in cooperation with the university community in Australia. It is operated by the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) on the nation's most powerful supercomputers.  ACCESS embodies a national approach to climate and weather prediction modelling that will give CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology the best possible scientific tools for climate impact and adaptation analysis, and weather forecasting. ACCESS will also help Australian scientists contribute to major international climate modelling and prediction projects, and will provide Australia’s major input to the fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on the world’s climate future. Once ACCESS is fully operational it will begin to explore vital but so far under-tested facets of climate change, such as how the earth’s biological systems will respond to warming and elevated CO2—will they absorb or release more carbon, damping the greenhouse process or pushing it into overdrive? At a continental scale it will explore how the Australian landmass itself will ‘breathe’ carbon and water, taking them in and releasing them and the subsequent net gains or losses. The answer to questions such as these affect everyone on the planet, determining how quickly society must move to zero carbon emissions and how steep will be the adjustments forced on people and the economy by the risk of dangerous change. To run such vast models and support the memory they demand will absorb a massive 3 terabytes—three trillion bytes—of computational power a month, a feat that nothing but the NCI’s supercomputer can support.  &rft.creator=Anonymous&rft.date=2013&rft_rights=All rights reserved by the contributing organisations&rft.type=dataset&rft.language=English Go to Data Provider

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Brief description

The Australian Community Climate and Earth System Simulator (ACCESS) is a coupled climate and earth system simulator being developed as a joint initiative of the Bureau of Meteorology and CSIRO in cooperation with the university community in Australia. It is operated by the National Computational Infrastructure (NCI) on the nation's most powerful supercomputers. 

ACCESS embodies a national approach to climate and weather prediction modelling that will give CSIRO and the Bureau of Meteorology the best possible scientific tools for climate impact and adaptation analysis, and weather forecasting.

ACCESS will also help Australian scientists contribute to major international climate modelling and prediction projects, and will provide Australia’s major input to the fifth assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) on the world’s climate future.

Once ACCESS is fully operational it will begin to explore vital but so far under-tested facets of climate change, such as how the earth’s biological systems will respond to warming and elevated CO2—will they absorb or release more carbon, damping the greenhouse process or pushing it into overdrive? At a continental scale it will explore how the Australian landmass itself will ‘breathe’ carbon and water, taking them in and releasing them and the subsequent net gains or losses.

The answer to questions such as these affect everyone on the planet, determining how quickly society must move to zero carbon emissions and how steep will be the adjustments forced on people and the economy by the risk of dangerous change.

To run such vast models and support the memory they demand will absorb a massive 3 terabytes—three trillion bytes—of computational power a month, a feat that nothing but the NCI’s supercomputer can support. 

159.105459,-9.221084 112.921454,-9.221084 112.921454,-54.777218 159.105459,-54.777218 159.105459,-9.221084

136.0134565,-31.999151

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